Farewell to Helios

Helios supercomputer (photo: Bull).

It is time to say goodbye to the Helios supercomputer located in the International Fusion Energy Research Centre (IFERC) in Rokkasho, Japan, hosted by the Japanese Atomic Energy Authority (JAEA).

From 2011 to 2016 Helios was one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers with a peak performance of more than 1.5 Petaflop/s. Its main goal was to give scientists the opportunity to perform complex calculations in plasma physics.

Read moreFarewell to Helios

Our research stays at the world’s largest fusion device with EUROfusion

Areal view of the JET site (photo: ccfe.ac.uk).

Our fusion group members Dani Gallart and Mervi Mantsinen are currently stationed at the JET tokamak, the world’s largest fusion device located at the Culham Science Center, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom.

At JET, Dani and Mervi are taking part in the EUROfusion modelling and analysis tasks in the preparation of the next campaigns. In particular, they are working to improve the preparedness of fusion simulation codes to simulate plasmas with tritium.

Read moreOur research stays at the world’s largest fusion device with EUROfusion

New incorporation to the Editorial Board of Plasma journal

Our Fusion Group Leader Dr Mervi Mantsinen has joined the Editorial Board of  Plasma journal published by MDPI.

Plasma is a new open-access, cross-disciplinary scholarly journal of scientific studies related to all aspects of plasma science, such as plasma physics, plasma chemistry and space plasma. Topics also include experimental and theoretical results, and progress of interdisciplinary and application sciences in this field.

Read moreNew incorporation to the Editorial Board of Plasma journal

Fusion Simulation Code Selected for Optimization on Three Pre-exascale Supercomputers

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the XGC code in Early Science programs for optimization on three powerful new supercomputers, which will serve as forerunners for even more powerful exascale machines that are to begin operating in the United States in the early 2020’s.

Read moreFusion Simulation Code Selected for Optimization on Three Pre-exascale Supercomputers

Tightening our collaboration with ITER

Aerial view of the ITER construction site. Credit © ITER Organization, http://www.iter.org/

The ITER Organization and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center have gone one step further in their collaboration to simulate the process of fusion power generation. Both parties have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in which they agree on the importance of promoting and furthering academic and scientific cooperation in all academic and scientific fields of mutual interest and to advance the training of young researchers.

ITER is the international nuclear fusion R&D project, which is building the world’s largest experimental tokamak in France. It aims to demonstrate that fusion energy is scientifically and technologically feasible.

Read moreTightening our collaboration with ITER