MareNostrum 5, the highest EU investment in a research infrastructure in Spain

On 7 June, the European Commission (EC) has officially announced that EuroHPC has selected Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) as one of the institutions that will host a pre-exascale supercomputer in the high-capacity supercomputer network that will operate in the EU in 2021. The EC announcement describes the plan to acquire 3 pre-exascale machines with a peak performance of at least 150 Petaflops: Barcelona (Spain), Bolonia (Italy) and Kajaani (Finland).

The future MareNostrum 5 will be a heterogenous supercomputer that will achieve a peak performance of 200 Petaflops (200 · 1015 of operations per second), which is 18 times more than current MareNostrum 4.

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BSC Talks: Looking at the stars

Earlier this week, BSC has posted in its YouTube account the talk given by our researchers, Dani Gallart and Xavier Sáez, in the last BSC Annual Meeting.

One of the most expected activities of the Annual Meeting was the “BSC talks” that promotes the internal knowledge about the work done at BSC. The “BSC Talks” section aims to be a showcase for BSC researchers presenting the work developed in their group to the rest of colleagues of the research center in the form of brief presentations of 10 minutes.

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CONICET scientist performs a stay at our group

Alejandro Soba.

From February to August 2019, the Fusion group is receiving the visit of a scientist from Argentina, Dr. Alejandro Soba of the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) and National Scientific and Technical Research Council  (CONICET). The objective of Dr. Soba’s stay is to develop a neutron transport deterministic module for the in-house code ALYA.

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Stunning simulation of a fusion reactor in operation

Simulation of JET with glass walls in operation (Photo: CCFE)

Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) is developing a new simulation tool knwon as CHERAB for forward modelling diagnostics based on spectroscopic plasma emission.

CHERAB is being used by fusion scientists to simulate all sorts of visible and infrared plasma measuring tools, known as diagnostics. The diagnostic systems measure the light output of the plasma to study properties such as its temperature and density. Inferring these properties requires an accurate understanding of how the light is produced and bounces around inside the machine. The more accurately we can model these systems the more accurate our measurements of fusion plasmas will be.

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